Tool Talk #12: Grizzly Bandsaw

Well over half of the emails sent to me are on the subject of tools. I have no objections to responding to them but I thought it would be beneficial to start a video library of sorts to briefly touch on what I think of a particular tool or set of tools. These won’t be in depth tool reviews as I know very few people are interested in that kind of thing and I really don’t want to go over all the details. Instead I’ll just focus on the things I like about the tool, things I don’t like about the tool, and would I buy it again. I have a huge list of “episodes” that can be made and plan on releasing one per week. Hopefully this will be helpful to some people.

Grizzly G0555LANV Bandsaw

I purchased the G0555LANV bandsaw a few years ago from Grizzly.com. I don’t recall the exact number but I believe I got it on sale for around $550 including shipping. You can see all the specs on it here.

What I like:

  • Powerful enough. Max capacity is 6-3/8″ or so and I cut 6″ thick of end grain oak with no problems.
  • Very little maintenance is required. I’ve only cleaned the pine pitch off the guide bearings. That’s it.
  • The fence is nice.
  • All of the adjustments are easy.
  • The stand is very sturdy.
  • Good value.

What I don’t like:

  • The table mount assembly isn’t as solid as I would like.
  • Dust collection is horrible.
  • I wish the fence was mounted in some other way which would allow for the blade removal slot to be in the front of the table.

Would I buy the g0555LANV again if I had to do it over?

Yes. If I went back in time and was in the exact same situation I was in when I bought it I would buy it again. It’s performed as expected and has been a very convenient machine as the amount of maintenance required has been minimal. I find it to be the best saw for the money in that price range. However, if I had to start my shop over tomorrow with my current situation I would not buy this machine. Instead I would buy a larger model that would allow 12″+ of resaw capacity which would better suit my current wants in a bandsaw.



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22 Comments

  1. Matt Mikolajczyk(michael-isaac)

    I really like these short tool posts. Pros and cons from a user of the tool, not a tool reviewer that gets a short time with tools only to give a one sided review, gives a better sense if something will work out got me. If I am looking to buy something, I want true feedback from an outsider! Thanks for posting!!!

  2. Udie (Canada)

    Jay – great review thanks for taking the time.
    FYI – Grizzly sells a 6″ Riser Block kit to increase your 6″ to a 12″.
    Not that expensive. That might be something that might interest you.

  3. Thomas

    I have the 17″ anniversary bandsaw, to help with dust collection I cut up some pipe insulation and wrapped it around the bottom guide bearing block. It took 2-3 pieces to get everything, but once its done it forms a bit of a channel for the dust to fall into and helps channel the dust collection to one area.

  4. ffifer

    Always like your Tool Talk videos. I have a limited budget and always need some owner insight on tools that give me the best bang for my buck.
    Thanks

  5. Gopher

    Jay – I have the same saw and it didn’t take more than a few months after purchase to realize I needed the riser. Fairly simple install and to me it has been more than worth the cost.

    The only thing (other than dust collection) I noticed was a slight bit of weather checking of the tires. Maybe due to my move from very low humidity area to high (Nevada to Florida).

    Great experience reviews. Simple and concise. Always the best formula for success.

  6. BuddyT

    I have this same exact saw and I’m very happy with it. Just yesterday I installed the 6″ riser block because I need to re-saw some 8″ wide stock today. I agree the dust collection is poor. I’ve seen some ideas on the Internet for building a DC box that fits under the table. I plan to try to build one in the next couple of months.

    I do want to ask what you mean by saying you’d like a “bigger” saw to provide more re-saw capacity.
    I ask because some of your viewers who are new to bandsaws (like I was when I purchased mine) might think you mean you wish you had bought a 16″ bandsaw for re-sawing. When I first started looking at bandsaws I thought the “size” of the bandsaw referred to vertical sawing capacity & not the horizontal width of the board that can pass through the throat. It was very confusing for me until I had a dealer explain it for me.

  7. Scott

    I own this saw and it is the worst large tool I have bought for my workshop. It cannot be tuned, I’ve spent several hours on the phone with Grizzly and even paid a woodworking “pro” to stop by and attempt the alignment. Don’t know what is the cause and probably won’t ever buy Grizzly again. Wish I would have returned it immediately but did not because I thought the problem was just me.

  8. Duffy Davis

    I have the same saw as Jay. I like it. The reason I bought it was the price and the ball bearing blade guides. All other saws, came with cool blocks. It is very easy to adjust the guides. I keep the allen wrenches on the saw with a magnet. I also bought the optional resaw fence, because I’m new to resawing. My old Craftsman couldn’t do resawing. I have no blade drift with this saw. My first resaw project was as good as my last resaw project. Of course, I followed the instructions of many YouTube videos, before I did my first cut on the saw.

  9. narnia456

    Hubby got me my Grizzly for Christmas. It’s been great for me as a beginner woodworker! It was easy to put together right out of the box! I have a riser for it but hafta get that round to it thing!

  10. John Cooper

    Good review. I own a Jet 14″ bandsaw and the fence has knobs underneath the fence so you can slide it to the right to make blade changes easier. Mine has the same problem with dust collection. I agree the solution is a port below the bottom wheel but the motor and belt assembly is there and makes that impossible. I’m lucky that my shop is in the country and I open my shop doors and use a leaf-blower as a dust solution. So far the wildlife haven’t complained. Regards, John

  11. Michael Olsen

    Great job as always my friend. I really appreciate you doing these.

    Since I my focus is more on hand tools (for me, my power tools mostly do the rough work), I find your insights on the power tools most insightful both for specifics of your particular model, and for general work considerations. My “wish list” is growing well thanks to you.

  12. Jeff Peters

    Sorry for the above post not sure how it got on your site. Was looking at another site that popped up after video video and thought I was posting there.
    And way what is your feeling on bearings verses the block guide system.
    Thinking about up grading. I have a 14″ band saw that is a Central Machinery unit that looks much like your Grizzley. It came with the 6″ riser block, so I can resaw almost 12″. It works well.

  13. Roger Johnson

    I too own the same bandsaw and only complaint is the dust collection. If you come up with some kind of jig to fix that issue please post. I do have mine on wheels so I can move it around my garage. I really enjoy your articles, thanks!

  14. Mark Redd

    Hi Jay, George Vandriska with the Woodworkers Guild of America has the same saw. He fixed the dust problem by cutting a hole on the bottom of the bottom door and screwing 4″ plastic flange adapter to it. He closed off the original dust collection hole and hooked up dust collection to the new hole and gets great dust collection.

  15. Dave Fligg

    Nice job Jay. I have access to a couple of Jet Bandsaws and my own is a 12″ SIP similar to the grizzly. From my experience the dust extraction seems to be only a token effort.
    I want to use a smaller blade than 3/16″. Have you any experience of the Carter Products adaptation. It looks like a long roller bearing with a grove in the centre and allows the blade to twist for small radii whilst supporting the blade at the rear.

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