Increasing Bandsaw Resaw Capacity With A Riser Block

I have a Grizzly G0555LANV 14” bandsaw. My only gripe with purchasing it was the lack of resaw capacity. From the factory it only has 6-3/8” resaw capacity. The least expensive solution to adding resaw capacity is to add a riser block to the bandsaw. This is something I’ve wanted to do for quite some time now but never got around to getting one.

In April, 2016 I attended the Woodworking Shows in Atlanta, GA. While there I was pleasantly surprised with a gift from a viewer which was a riser block for my particular bandsaw. I hate to say it but I honestly forgot the name of the kind gentleman who gave it to me as that whole weekend was a huge whirlwind. However, you know who you are and thank you once again.

Fast forward a month and a two weeks later and I finally got around to installing it. I somewhat put this upgrade off because I thought it would be a little more involved than I wanted. As it turns out, it’s a crazy easy upgrade that didn’t take long at all. Especially considering I had my friend Jeff in the shop with me to help with the install.

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First up is the removal of the old blade.

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Followed by the left side blade guard. Two screws for this step.

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The switch housing also needs to be removed. Two screws top and bottom and one screw holding the wires in place. The switch can be set aside.

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Before unbolting the frame I thought it would be a good idea to lower the blade guard all the way as to act as a leg. This will prevent the upper part of the frame from falling over as the frame bolt is removed.

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The frame bolt can now be removed.

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With the frame bolt removed the top half of the frame can be set aside. This was a lot lighter than I thought it was going to be.

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And just that quick we start to reassemble the saw starting with the addition of the actual riser block. This block is about 6” tall so that will give us a final resaw capacity of about 12”. The block has markings to designate the front and back of the saw.

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Next, the upper frame assembly can be set onto the riser block. At this point the stock blade guard is still installed so a scrap block is needed to make up the difference so that the blade guard can again be used as another support leg to prevent the upper frame assembly from tipping.

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A much longer bolt is used to bolt the frame back together.

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The install of the new blade guard starts with the removal of the old blade guard, the height adjustment knob, and the height adjustment rack.

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Before the new height adjustment rack can be installed a couple of set screws need to be backed out.

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With the new height adjustment rack in place and the set screws positioned the blade guard height adjustment knob can be installed.

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The blade guard and bearing assembly can be reinstalled on the blade guard height adjustment rack.

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Because we are gaining 6” of resaw capacity a longer blade guard is needed. Instead of being one piece this one is adjustable to fit inside the upper wheel door when taller cuts are made.

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The rest of the process is in reverse order. The switch box is mounted in the same location.

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Followed by a longer left side blade guard.

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The kit comes with a new blade that is 105” long. This also means that Jeff left with all of my 93-1/2” bandsaw blades for use on his saw. With the new blade installed and everything properly adjusted I had to try it out. The widest piece of scrap I could find was a piece of 2×10 pine. At 9-1/4” wide it’s not max capacity for this upgrade but it is 3” wider than anything I’ve ever cut on this saw.

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In conclusion, adding a riser block to my Grizzly G0555LANV bandsaw was incredibly easy to do. It didn’t take long at all and I should have done it sooner.

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10 Comments

  1. Edison Norman

    Great adjustment Jay. I was wondering how those risers work for the bandsaw. Thanks!

  2. john cooper

    Well, you just inspired me to buy a riser kit for my 14″ Jet bandsaw. My Father’s Day present to myself. Only $105 on eBay made it relatively painless to go ahead and do it. In this area there is an almost endless supply of hardwoods that end up being firewood so I plan to build a resaw jig and take advantage of the material.

  3. JOHN MORRISON

    VERY INTERESTING , NOW ALL I NEED IS A BAND SAW. STILL,I NEVER THOUGHT YOU COULD INCREASE THE SIZE OF THE CUT LIKE THAT.
    I THOUGHT IF YOU WANTED A BAND SAW THAT WAS LARGET ,YOU HAD TO BUY A LARGER SAW COMPLETE .

  4. narnia456

    Thanks for de-mystifying the process! We have the same saw! DreadKnot had given me one we thought had might worked, but one part was different. Now I don’t have to put off doing this! Calling Grizzly soon!

  5. Jeff Peters

    Jay I have a General 14″ bandsaw that I also have put in a 6″ riser block in.
    I do a lot of antique boat restoring and use my band saw to resaw Mahogany wood to book match the decks
    I use a 1/2″ resaw 3-4 hook tooth blade from Timberwolf. I have a very simple resaw fence,
    So if you can tell me how to post a picture here I will share it with everyone.
    Jeff

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